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Discover How to Shatter Money Taboos

A podcast series aimed at helping you talk more openly about money.

Money silence has a crippling effort on all of us. Just look at these startling statistics:

  • 50% of marriages end in divorce with financial conflict a leading contributor
  • 69% of parents are more comfortable talking to their teens about sex than money
  • 70% of women don’t negotiate their salaries, contributing to the gender wage gap

Your host, Kathleen Burns Kingsbury, decided years ago that being quiet was not her strong suit. In this podcast, she uses her voice to empower her guests to identify and dispel money myths that block them from living financially and emotionally fulfilled lives.

Each episode is only twenty minutes long so you can listen on your commute to and from work, while exercising in the gym, or in the comfort of your own home.

If you want to engage in a wealth conversation with your partner, a parent, your kids, or your boss, this podcast series will show you how.

Recent Episodes

Myth: Women are not interested in finances.

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts, Women and Wealth | No Comments

Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial

Join Kathleen and her guest Kathleen Peace as they bust this myth wide open and show you how women are just as savvy and interested in finances as men. Find out how even women who are labeled as “gold diggers” are demonstrating their interest in money and wealth, and discover tips for challenging your thinking when it comes to this fallacy.

Key Take Aways

  • Women investors and traders actually perform better than their male counterparts due to their calm, and more methodical approach to managing and investing money.
  • Listeners should ask the women in their lives (wives, mothers, sisters or daughters) if they are interested in finance. If these women say no, then find out why not. For those who truly are disinterested, use this underlying cause as a pathway into making financial conversations more relevant to their lives and give them a positive experience of talking about money.
  • To find out more about where your money is going, track the inflows and outflows of cash in your life. Seeing where the money flows is a great place to start examining if you are using your resources in a way that is congruent with your values and goals.

Bio:

Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial, has more than two decades of experience in the financial industry and has dedicated her career to being an ally and resource for female entrepreneurs.

After spending the first half of her working life on Bay and Wall Streets, she returned to Toronto to start a family and spend more of her professional life directly helping people. Now she combines her financial prowess and love for building community by acting as a personal CFO and champion to a group of driven, successful women.

Her specialties include corporate reorganization, planning for and effectively managing liquidity events, socially responsible investing, financial issues of divorce and estate planning.

 

Myth: Men should manage the money.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women Empowerment | No Comments

Stacy Francis, CFP®, CDFA®, CES™, Francis Financial 

The myth that men should manage the money is one that many women succumb to when they get married. This includes women who for years managed their own money during college and at the beginning of a career. However, approximately 80% of women will end up having to manage their money without a partner at some point in their life due to divorce or the death of a spouse. Stacy and Kathleen investigate this myth and how it can severely disadvantage women throughout their lives.

Take Aways:

  1. The upside. There is an upside to men always managing the money. In the short run, some women who are intimidated by finances or who don’t feel they have the time to devote to money management get relief from this responsibility. Eventually, the upside diminishes and can create a real problem for women after a divorce, or the death of their partner. 
  1. Try a money date. A great way to get more comfortable with money is to have a date night to talk about finances in a non-threatening and engaging way. Listen and learn how Stacy and her husband have gotten creative with their money dates so everyone gets their needs met. 
  1. Use apps. It is important for each person to fully understand where the money is going. Using finance tools like Mint.com is a great way to integrate spending with education about where your money is going. It is an easy online system that connects with your bank accounts, tracks your spending, and even categorizes them for you. 

Bio:

Stacy Francis, CFP®, CDFA®, CES™ 

Stacy is the President and CEO of Francis Financial, which she founded 15 years ago. She is a Certified Financial Planner® (CFP®), Certified Divorce Financial Analyst® (CDFA®) and a Certified Estate and Trust Specialist (CES™). She is also the founder of Savvy Ladies™, a nonprofit that has provided free personal finance education and resources to over 15,000 women. 

Stacy has received numerous awards including Investment News Top 20 Women to Watch in the United States, Financial Planning Association’s Heart of Financial Planning Award and Financial Planning Magazine’s Pro Bono Award. She was also listed as a National Money Hero by CNN Money Magazine and received the Women’s Choice Award for one of the best financial advisors for women. 

She is a nationally-recognized financial expert as an active member of CNBC’s Digital Financial Advisor Council, the Forbes Finance Council, as well as an expert contributor for The Wall Street Journal. She has appeared in over 100 media outlets including CNBC, CNN, Good Morning America, Investment News, Money Magazine, NBC, The New York Times, and USA Today. 

Special Offer:

Stacy recently released her own podcast. Every other Tuesday, tune in to Financially Ever After with Stacy Francis. Download Unveiling the Unspoken Truth, The Financial Challenges Women Face During and After Divorce.

Myth: Parents must protect their children from college financing decisions

By | Family and Money, Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ryan Lane, Senior Editor, American Student Assistance 

The college selection process is complex and stressful, and many parents fail to discuss the long-term financial ramifications of taking on student loan debt with their children. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Ryan discuss how many parents try to protect their children by not talking about money, but do the family a disservice by not engaging in this important and enlightening conversation. Ryan offers tips for involving your children in the college funding decision-making process and how doing so can help them avoid huge student loan debt when they graduate from school. 

Take Aways: 

  1. Start the college application process early by involving your children in the FAFSA process and talking about different ways to finance their education, such as loans, grants, scholarships, and good old hard work.
  2. Schedule a money talk with your children to discuss the FAFSA results, repayment schedule, how it may affect their college choice. Create a mock budget to demonstrate the long-term, real-life impact of each of the funding options.
  3. When discussing this topic with recent graduates, encourage them to pay down student loans faster by making an extra payment per year. Have your child calculate the amount of money saved by avoiding additional interest expenses. Then brainstorm all the other ways they could use this cash. For example, if you save $1000 in interest expense, what could you buy instead? A long weekend in Bermuda comes to mind?!

Guest Bio:

Ryan Lane is the Senior Editor, at the national nonprofit American Student Assistance. In his role, he oversees the development of articles, infographics, course materials for the organization’s free education finance support program: Salt. Working with internal and external subject matter experts, Ryan creates content that simplifies the world of college financing and helps families successfully plan for, pay for, and repay higher education expenses. Over the past three years, he has written about student loans as a co-author of the U.S. News & World Report Blog “The Student Loan Ranger.” For more information about Ryan and the ASA, visit http://www.asa.org/.

Myth: Spending is bad

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Brittney Castro, CFP®. CRPC®, AAMS®, Founder and CEO, Financially Wise Women

Many of us grew up with the financial psychology mindset that spending money is bad. For example, do you cringe when you spend money or feel guilty? Do you hide your spending from family members? If so, then today’s episode is for you. Kathleen interviews Brittney Castro about spending – the good and the bad – and busts the myth that all spending is bad. Listen in and you may find that this show affects your spending habits and your romantic relationships.

Take Aways:

  1. Conscientious spending is an important part of an overall financial plan. Therefore, when you develop a budget, it’s important to allocate money towards areas that you value most. These areas are those that bring you happiness or joy in your everyday life. For example, one area may be self-care. Investing in restorative activities makes you better able to take care of others and achieve more life/work balance.
  2. Money is a tool to invest in yourself for the long term. By investing in yourself in the long term, you can gain more self-confidence and strengthen your relationships. It’s all about the journey and progress over perfection.
  3. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. There is no limit to the help you can ask for and actually asking for assistance makes your life easier and more fun! So build a team or find the resources to help you achieve your goals. As I always say, “Practice receiving!’

Guest Bio:

Brittney Castro is the founder and CEO of Financially Wise Women, a Los Angeles-based financial planning firm whose mission is to teach women and couples the art of managing their money the fun and simple way. As a Certified Financial Planner® and speaker, Brittney works with busy professional women and couples who are ready to make their finances work for them and use their money to live the lives of their dreams.

You may have seen Brittney on CNN, CNBC, or CBS. Or you may have read her articles in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, or Glamour. Because she just loves spreading her wisdom about finance, entrepreneurship and smart investing to the masses. Follow her on twitter @BrittneyCastro.

Special Offer: Free Money Class training series – Get access to the trainings here. Brittney has put together a free video training series that talks about what it really takes to be confident, empowered and feel intelligent in this area of your life. Full disclosure, KBK is an affiliate for this program.  Click here (https://ih106.isrefer.com/go/mc2014/kbkspeaks/) to learn more.

 

Myth: Only male entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ann Bradt, Capital Ready, Co-Founder

There are many myths about entrepreneurship that can reinforce stereotypes, one of which is that only men want to grow their businesses. Kathleen and Ann bust open this myth and teach listeners the facts about female entrepreneurs and their desire to compete with the big boys. Listen in to their discussion about how women entrepreneurs can position themselves for growth, obtain venture capital, and overcome roadblocks they may face in the process.

Key Take Aways:

Women entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses but typically approach the growth process differently than their male counterparts.

Research shows that venture capitalists and bankers ask business owners different questions based on gender and these inquiries influence how funding is provided.

Both women entrepreneurs and the financial services professional who work with them need to learn how to communicate in a more gender savvy manner and how doing so is a win for both their businesses and their clients.

Guest Bio:

Ann Bradt, co-founder of Capital Ready is an accomplished expert in the financial services industry, implementing progressive people strategies for over two decades as a human resources professional at a major Canadian bank. Her extensive experience includes talent planning, leadership development, executive succession, and developing learning strategies. Ann’s passion and drive have equipped her with a broad knowledge of the industry, with her career spanning Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Capital Ready work with established businesses to help them grow and offer strategic blueprints and action plans to assess barriers and identify opportunities to optimize human and financial capital. To learn more about Capital Ready, visit www.capitalready.ca. Follow us on twitter @CapitalReadyInc

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