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Podcasts

Myth: Women are not interested in finances.

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts, Women and Wealth | No Comments

Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial

Join Kathleen and her guest Kathleen Peace as they bust this myth wide open and show you how women are just as savvy and interested in finances as men. Find out how even women who are labeled as “gold diggers” are demonstrating their interest in money and wealth, and discover tips for challenging your thinking when it comes to this fallacy.

Key Take Aways

  • Women investors and traders actually perform better than their male counterparts due to their calm, and more methodical approach to managing and investing money.
  • Listeners should ask the women in their lives (wives, mothers, sisters or daughters) if they are interested in finance. If these women say no, then find out why not. For those who truly are disinterested, use this underlying cause as a pathway into making financial conversations more relevant to their lives and give them a positive experience of talking about money.
  • To find out more about where your money is going, track the inflows and outflows of cash in your life. Seeing where the money flows is a great place to start examining if you are using your resources in a way that is congruent with your values and goals.

Bio:

Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial, has more than two decades of experience in the financial industry and has dedicated her career to being an ally and resource for female entrepreneurs.

After spending the first half of her working life on Bay and Wall Streets, she returned to Toronto to start a family and spend more of her professional life directly helping people. Now she combines her financial prowess and love for building community by acting as a personal CFO and champion to a group of driven, successful women.

Her specialties include corporate reorganization, planning for and effectively managing liquidity events, socially responsible investing, financial issues of divorce and estate planning.

 

Myth: Men should manage the money.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women Empowerment | No Comments

Stacy Francis, CFP®, CDFA®, CES™, Francis Financial 

The myth that men should manage the money is one that many women succumb to when they get married. This includes women who for years managed their own money during college and at the beginning of a career. However, approximately 80% of women will end up having to manage their money without a partner at some point in their life due to divorce or the death of a spouse. Stacy and Kathleen investigate this myth and how it can severely disadvantage women throughout their lives.

Take Aways:

  1. The upside. There is an upside to men always managing the money. In the short run, some women who are intimidated by finances or who don’t feel they have the time to devote to money management get relief from this responsibility. Eventually, the upside diminishes and can create a real problem for women after a divorce, or the death of their partner. 
  1. Try a money date. A great way to get more comfortable with money is to have a date night to talk about finances in a non-threatening and engaging way. Listen and learn how Stacy and her husband have gotten creative with their money dates so everyone gets their needs met. 
  1. Use apps. It is important for each person to fully understand where the money is going. Using finance tools like Mint.com is a great way to integrate spending with education about where your money is going. It is an easy online system that connects with your bank accounts, tracks your spending, and even categorizes them for you. 

Bio:

Stacy Francis, CFP®, CDFA®, CES™ 

Stacy is the President and CEO of Francis Financial, which she founded 15 years ago. She is a Certified Financial Planner® (CFP®), Certified Divorce Financial Analyst® (CDFA®) and a Certified Estate and Trust Specialist (CES™). She is also the founder of Savvy Ladies™, a nonprofit that has provided free personal finance education and resources to over 15,000 women. 

Stacy has received numerous awards including Investment News Top 20 Women to Watch in the United States, Financial Planning Association’s Heart of Financial Planning Award and Financial Planning Magazine’s Pro Bono Award. She was also listed as a National Money Hero by CNN Money Magazine and received the Women’s Choice Award for one of the best financial advisors for women. 

She is a nationally-recognized financial expert as an active member of CNBC’s Digital Financial Advisor Council, the Forbes Finance Council, as well as an expert contributor for The Wall Street Journal. She has appeared in over 100 media outlets including CNBC, CNN, Good Morning America, Investment News, Money Magazine, NBC, The New York Times, and USA Today. 

Special Offer:

Stacy recently released her own podcast. Every other Tuesday, tune in to Financially Ever After with Stacy Francis. Download Unveiling the Unspoken Truth, The Financial Challenges Women Face During and After Divorce.

Myth: Parents must protect their children from college financing decisions

By | Family and Money, Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ryan Lane, Senior Editor, American Student Assistance 

The college selection process is complex and stressful, and many parents fail to discuss the long-term financial ramifications of taking on student loan debt with their children. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Ryan discuss how many parents try to protect their children by not talking about money, but do the family a disservice by not engaging in this important and enlightening conversation. Ryan offers tips for involving your children in the college funding decision-making process and how doing so can help them avoid huge student loan debt when they graduate from school. 

Take Aways: 

  1. Start the college application process early by involving your children in the FAFSA process and talking about different ways to finance their education, such as loans, grants, scholarships, and good old hard work.
  2. Schedule a money talk with your children to discuss the FAFSA results, repayment schedule, how it may affect their college choice. Create a mock budget to demonstrate the long-term, real-life impact of each of the funding options.
  3. When discussing this topic with recent graduates, encourage them to pay down student loans faster by making an extra payment per year. Have your child calculate the amount of money saved by avoiding additional interest expenses. Then brainstorm all the other ways they could use this cash. For example, if you save $1000 in interest expense, what could you buy instead? A long weekend in Bermuda comes to mind?!

Guest Bio:

Ryan Lane is the Senior Editor, at the national nonprofit American Student Assistance. In his role, he oversees the development of articles, infographics, course materials for the organization’s free education finance support program: Salt. Working with internal and external subject matter experts, Ryan creates content that simplifies the world of college financing and helps families successfully plan for, pay for, and repay higher education expenses. Over the past three years, he has written about student loans as a co-author of the U.S. News & World Report Blog “The Student Loan Ranger.” For more information about Ryan and the ASA, visit http://www.asa.org/.

Myth: Spending is bad

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Brittney Castro, CFP®. CRPC®, AAMS®, Founder and CEO, Financially Wise Women

Many of us grew up with the financial psychology mindset that spending money is bad. For example, do you cringe when you spend money or feel guilty? Do you hide your spending from family members? If so, then today’s episode is for you. Kathleen interviews Brittney Castro about spending – the good and the bad – and busts the myth that all spending is bad. Listen in and you may find that this show affects your spending habits and your romantic relationships.

Take Aways:

  1. Conscientious spending is an important part of an overall financial plan. Therefore, when you develop a budget, it’s important to allocate money towards areas that you value most. These areas are those that bring you happiness or joy in your everyday life. For example, one area may be self-care. Investing in restorative activities makes you better able to take care of others and achieve more life/work balance.
  2. Money is a tool to invest in yourself for the long term. By investing in yourself in the long term, you can gain more self-confidence and strengthen your relationships. It’s all about the journey and progress over perfection.
  3. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. There is no limit to the help you can ask for and actually asking for assistance makes your life easier and more fun! So build a team or find the resources to help you achieve your goals. As I always say, “Practice receiving!’

Guest Bio:

Brittney Castro is the founder and CEO of Financially Wise Women, a Los Angeles-based financial planning firm whose mission is to teach women and couples the art of managing their money the fun and simple way. As a Certified Financial Planner® and speaker, Brittney works with busy professional women and couples who are ready to make their finances work for them and use their money to live the lives of their dreams.

You may have seen Brittney on CNN, CNBC, or CBS. Or you may have read her articles in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, or Glamour. Because she just loves spreading her wisdom about finance, entrepreneurship and smart investing to the masses. Follow her on twitter @BrittneyCastro.

Special Offer: Free Money Class training series – Get access to the trainings here. Brittney has put together a free video training series that talks about what it really takes to be confident, empowered and feel intelligent in this area of your life. Full disclosure, KBK is an affiliate for this program.  Click here (https://ih106.isrefer.com/go/mc2014/kbkspeaks/) to learn more.

 

Myth: Only male entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses

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Ann Bradt, Capital Ready, Co-Founder

There are many myths about entrepreneurship that can reinforce stereotypes, one of which is that only men want to grow their businesses. Kathleen and Ann bust open this myth and teach listeners the facts about female entrepreneurs and their desire to compete with the big boys. Listen in to their discussion about how women entrepreneurs can position themselves for growth, obtain venture capital, and overcome roadblocks they may face in the process.

Key Take Aways:

Women entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses but typically approach the growth process differently than their male counterparts.

Research shows that venture capitalists and bankers ask business owners different questions based on gender and these inquiries influence how funding is provided.

Both women entrepreneurs and the financial services professional who work with them need to learn how to communicate in a more gender savvy manner and how doing so is a win for both their businesses and their clients.

Guest Bio:

Ann Bradt, co-founder of Capital Ready is an accomplished expert in the financial services industry, implementing progressive people strategies for over two decades as a human resources professional at a major Canadian bank. Her extensive experience includes talent planning, leadership development, executive succession, and developing learning strategies. Ann’s passion and drive have equipped her with a broad knowledge of the industry, with her career spanning Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Capital Ready work with established businesses to help them grow and offer strategic blueprints and action plans to assess barriers and identify opportunities to optimize human and financial capital. To learn more about Capital Ready, visit www.capitalready.ca. Follow us on twitter @CapitalReadyInc

Myth: I don’t need to talk about finances before getting married.

By | Couples and Money, Podcasts | No Comments

Julie Lawrence, CFP®, Lawrence Financial Planning, LLC

Not talking about money is the number two reason couples divorce according to Marriage.com. But couples who discuss money matters regularly act as a team and report greater levels of satisfaction with their partners. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Julie Lawrence, CFP®, examine the myth that couples don’t need to talk about finances before getting married. Listen in and learn some tips for talking about money with your honey!

Key Take Aways:

  • Julie shares how she facilitates the telling of each partner’s money biography (consisting of a list of open-ended questions) and how this strategy helps the couple she works with discover their respective money mindsets.
  • Communicating honestly about your saving and spending behaviors can be challenging. But doing so can really help partners understand each other. You may not change your money behaviors, but together you can commit and work toward shared couple goals.
  • Different strategies work for different money personalities. For example, if you are a spender, setting up an automatic savings withdrawal each month makes sense. If you don’t see the money, you won’t spend it!

Julie Lawrence, CFP® opened Lawrence Financial Planning in 2009. She has more than 28 years of experience in finance and management and holds a B.A. in Management from National Louis University.

Julie has been quoted in Financial Planning magazine, Investment News, NAPFA Advisor magazine, the Saint Petersburg Times, MSNMoney.com, the Chicago Tribune and FinancialPlanning.com. She serves as a mentor for new ACP financial planners and is an active member of NAPFA.

Julie has lived in Florida since 1977. She has three children. In her spare time, she practices yoga, walks, and goes kayaking.

Myth: Keeping business costs as low as possible maximizes profits.

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Ken Lizotte, Author and Chief Imaginative Officer, emerson consulting, inc.

Many business owners believe they should maximize their profits by keeping their expenses as low as possible. In this episode, Ken Lizotte and Kathleen explore when, how, and why to invest in yourself and in your business and how that leads to sustainable profitability. As you find out, spending money to develop skills or expand your business can actually set you apart from the competition. It is what both these successful thought leaders have done, so listen in and find out how to bust this myth wide open.

Key Take Aways:

  1. Anticipate expenses. As Ken says, when you do your annual budget, set aside some resources for marketing and personal growth courses or coaching.
  2. Trust your gut. Not all investments, coaches or training programs are for all people. Do your research, and then trust your instincts.
  3. Learn from your mistakes. Part of being a business owner is taking risks and sometimes failing. When you realize that you have made a poor investment of your time or money, change course. It can be difficult to realize you have made a mistake, but the sooner you do and the quicker you change course, the better off you and your business will be.

Guest Bio:

Ken Lizotte is the author of seven books including his most recent The Speaker’s Edge: the Ultimate Go-To Guide for Locating and Landing Lots of Speaking Gigs and The Expert’s Edge: Become the Go-To Authority that People Turn to Every Time.  He is the Chief Imaginative Officer of emerson consulting group inc., a Concord, Massachusetts consulting firm that transforms speakers and consultants into “thought leaders” by helping them write and publish their ideas as articles and books. Kathleen has worked with Ken since 2010.

Ken lives in Concord, Massachusetts with his wife Barbara, daughter Chloe and Golden Retriever puppy Beckett.

Special Announcement: Check out Ken’s latest collaboration, What Would Henry Do? Essays for the 21st Century” with Introduction by Ken and featured essays by 40 scholars, activists, authors, celebrities including President Jimmy Carter. Published by Thoreau Farm, the birthplace of Henry David Thoreau as a fundraiser.

Myth: I don’t need to worry about money, some day my prince will come.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women Empowerment | No Comments

Barbara Stanny, Author Prince Charming Isn’t Coming

Women can have a love/hate relationship with money. Even in today’s society, some women feel they are not going to be attractive to a mate if they are financially put together. Barbara Stanny and Kathleen delve into the notion that women are still waiting for Prince Charming to rescue them financially instead of empowering themselves to learn about investments and money management. Listen in as they discuss the importance of busting this myth wide open so that women of all ages can be more financially intelligent and set a good example for the next generation.

Take Aways:

Barbara explains that getting smart about money involves a three-pronged process – the outer work (education), the inner work (money mindsets), and the higher work (your life purpose).

You need to take small steps consistently and you will see remarkable results.

Money doesn’t come from what you earn, it comes from what you do with what you earn. (Click to Tweet)]

 Barbara Stanny is the best-selling author of Prince Charming Isn’t Coming, Secrets of Six-Figure Women, and Overcoming Underearning®.  She has been teaching women how to take charge of their money and take charge of their lives for 20 plus years. An experienced mentor, wealth coach, and sought-after speaker, Barbara can help you create the wealth you desire and the life you deserve. 

Special Offer:

Free e-book “So You’ve Made Good Money…Now What?

Myth: Couples don’t need to talk about money

By | Couples and Money, Podcasts | No Comments

Dr. Dorian Mintzer, Revolution Retirement

As a child, Dori grew up recognizing different money mindsets by watching her parents’ financial habits. Couples may have a division of labor when it comes to finances; but, it is important they talk about them so they know what questions should be asked in times of crisis. Dori and Kathleen explore this myth and why it is important that couples need to talk about money and that is actually an act of love.

Take Aways:

  • Use “I” statements when talking about money
  • Ask a third person (financial advisor, banker, estate attorney, relationship or money coach) to help facilitate these conversations
  • Appreciate your partner in a money conversation (share what it was like growing up, was money talked about, what does money mean to you, etc.)

How do you honestly and openly talk about money as a couple? (Click to Tweet)

Dr. Dori Mintzer – With over 40 years of experience as a psychologist, Dr. Dorian Mintzer (Dori) is an experienced therapist, executive coach, consultant, speaker, and writer. She is the co-author of The Couples Retirement Puzzle: The 10 Must-Have Conversations for Creating an Amazing New Life Together, and co-producer of “The Career Playbook: Second Half Plays. Dori has been featured in a variety of media such as the NY Times, Wall Street Journal, NPR, ABC Evening News, and the Today Show. For more information visit www.revolutionizeretirement.com.

Special Offer:

Virtual: The 4th Tuesday Revolutionize your Retirement Interview with Expert’s Series is at 12:00 noon eastern time and open to professionals and the public. Sign-up begins the week before each call at www.revolutionizeretirement.com.

To sign up for the Breaking Money Silence Podcast, click here.

A Man is a Plan.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women Empowerment | No Comments

Paula Harris, Co-Founder, WH Cornerstone Investments

A man is a plan is a myth many women, unfortunately, use to avoid dealing with their finances. In this podcast, listen to Kathleen interview Paula about how to break this myth down so you can start to make simple decisions every day to reach financial security.

Listen in and discover:

  • Why it is important to take care of yourself financially and not wait until you are married to let your partner do it for you.
  • How to practice the “set it and forget” method of saving.
  • Ways to set realistic financial goals.
  • Why delaying gratification today is part of any sound financial plan.
  • How a certified financial planner can help.

WH Cornerstone’s co-founder, Paula Harris is part financial therapist and part dream architect. She takes great pride in helping her clients, particularly women, obtain financial peace of mind and independence. In addition to her role as co-founder, Paula is very actively involved in the community. In the past, she has served on several boards including serving as the Past President of the Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestra and the 2012 Chairman of the Board for the South Shore Chamber of Commerce. She currently is an advisory board member of empowerHER.

Paula is a graduate of Providence College and now lives in Plymouth, MA and the Berkshires with her husband and co-founder, Bill Harris.

To sign up for the Breaking Money Silence Podcast, click here.